Different objectives call for different question types, and Fluxey features all of the most frequently used question types. Knowing the differences between how the question types work and when you should apply them will make your surveys easier to use, and give you more reliable results. This guide will take you through each question type (arranged in the Builder as ‘blocks’ which you drag into your survey)

Heading

When you drop a Heading block into your survey, its default text is “I’m heading up this section”, which gives a bit of an indication of how you would use a heading. Use it at the top of a page, or even in the middle of a page to label sections, such as “Personal details”, “favourite albums” or “Financial questions”.

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Headings in Fluxey have the ability to be quite long, but the fonts used in most of the style templates mean that you might want to use a Free Text block for extended prose to avoid looking too aggressive.

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Don’t forget that you can also add a Title to your survey by clicking on the header image at the top of your survey.

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Free text

Free text blocks aren’t really questions, as there is no response available. They are useful for giving background information to respondents, or providing a statement that respondents need to answer several questions on afterwards. It’s even possible to build a contract of sorts from Fluxey (probably not legally binding), where all of the terms are laid out in a Free text block, and respondents acknowledge them by checking a box and entering their details below.

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Text

As compared to the Free Text block, a Text question can have a response. The response is totally open to the respondent, and is useful if you don’t know what the possible answers are to the question you are asking. A text question can be used for asking something as simple as a respondent’s name, or something as complex as “Do you have any further feedback not covered in the questions above?” Please note that text responses are limited to 1000 characters (including spaces), so no suitable for an essay response.

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Radio

Radio-button questions are probably the simplest type of survey question, and (along with checkboxes) are the bread-and-butter of most surveys. Simply ask a question, present two or more responses to choose from, and respondents choose one of them as their answer. If only the multiple-choice questions you did at school looked this good! Remember that if multiple options may be chosen, a checkbox would be a better question type. Premium users can add images to their questions, and even their answers. Creative survey builders could even build a survey that uses no words at all….

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Checkbox

A Checkbox question looks a lot like a Radio button question, except that respondents can choose more than one response. Great for a “Which of the following…” question. Please note that a Checkbox might not be the place to have a Response required, unless your question is framed “please choose one or more of the following” or similar.

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While a Checkbox question looks like a Radio question, a Dropdown response works the same as a Radio button question, without the buttons. A Dropdown list is useful if you have many response options, and you want to condense the size of the question box.

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Rating

Use a Rating question to gauge opinions. The default setting has 5 options, from “Strongly Disagree” to “Strongly Agree”. Add further options if you want a more nuanced opinion, take out the “Strongly” options, or take out the “Neutral” option if you want to force an opinion one way or the other. You can also change the wording to better suit the tone of your survey.

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Ranking

A Ranking question is a great way to see how respondents value options against each other. Find out what out of a number of options is most important, most popular or most preferred. Rather than forcing respondents to enter numbers etc, Fluxey allows respondents to simply drag and drop the options in preference order. In order to identify that respondents aren’t just taking the easy way out and leaving a default, options are randomised for each respondent. That way, trends can be identified, especially as your response rate grows.

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Page break

Having all of your questions on one page can leave respondents a bit overwhelmed, and may lead to non-complete responses. Add page breaks to break your survey up, grouping questions by a theme; like demographic questions, responses relating to a particular image or statement, or with a certain questions type.

Page breaks are also the backbone of the Linking feature of Fluxey, allowing respondents to automatically skip parts of your survey based on their answers. See our in-depth *link guide to see more about how linking works.

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